A blue rose

I purchased the rose “blue for you” last year as I was intrigued by the colour advertised. This rose is one of a few varieties of genetically engineered roses to produce delphidin – the compound that imparts blue colour to violets and other blue flowers. Finally spring arrived and the rose has flowered. It is not strictly blue but more a lavender/purple but is the closest I have seen any rose come to the as yet impossible “blue” colour.
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_DSC5669Larger versions of these photos are available from Flickr by clicking on the photos. Comments welcome!

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Wildflower diary – Solanum dulcamara 

Found these growing on a hedgerow and it took a little while to identify as the bittersweet nightshade, a relative of deadly nightshade (Solanum nigrum). S. dulcamara  is also poisonous but not as much as S. nigrum. 

Straight off the iPhone camera with no post processing.

  

Joys of a revived one!

My pot bound Chinese rose (Hibiscus rosa sinensis) almost died last year due to a nasty mealy bug infestation. In desperation I chopped the branches down till I was left with a few stalks and no leaves. I left it undisturbed over the winter in the conservatory with minimal watering. This year the plant is back and has set buds like the one shown below. Needless to say, I’m extremely pleased!
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Best appreciated in large size.  Shot with a Nikon D7000 and a 105mm Sigma f2.8 macro lens. ISO 320, 1/250, f/4.5.

Flaming Tulip

As most everyone else my visit to Keukenhof Tulip gardens 3 years ago resulted in the purchase of tulip bulbs. Many of these lasted one season only but the one below has been a repeat flowerer. The is the Estella Rijnveld Parrot Tulip with bright red and creamy wavy petals. They are indeed spectacular, are they not?
_DSC5645Click on the picture for a larger version on my flickr page!

Bleeding Hearts!

A friend gifted us this plant many years ago, and it makes its yearly appearance every spring in one corner of our garden. The flowers are beautiful pink and white and arranged in long pendants. The bleeding heart plant (Lamprocapnos spectabilishas other common names including “lady in a bath”.

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Lamprocapnos spectabilis (Bleeding heart)

Please click on the picture for more options to see this photo on Flickr.

The future is…Orange!

This a Ranunculus plant I found growing in a weed patch and rescued! The plant has settled in nicely in a pot and has provided me with these large glorious bright orange flowers.
_DSC5654View in large format by clicking on the photograph. Shot with a Nikon D7000 with a 105mm f/2.8 lens. 1/125 f/11.