McWay Falls, Big Sur

I happened to be in California the last two weeks on work related business. Over the weekend my cousin drove me down the scenic pacific coast on the scenic Route 101 from San Francisco to the Big Sur and back. Sadly the day was overcast but we managed to take in some pretty sights along the way, including the famous McWay Falls in the Julia Pfeiffer Burns State Park. Sadly in the absence of a wide-angle lens, I had to resort to taking overlapping photos with my 50mm and then stitching them in Adobe Lightroom.

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Composite of 5 stiched photos. See in large size on Flickr by clicking on the photo!

Here is another close-up of the McWay Falls, this time in HDR.

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See in large size on Flickr by clicking on the photo above.
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In multiples..

I was in Cornwall last week. This picture was taken at Kynance Cove in the Lizard Peninsula. It is a stitched panorama of 7 overlapping photographs while my son obliged by running across. Click on the photo and follow the link to see the photo in large size! Shot at low tide around 8:30PM.

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Kynance Cove (see larger image on Flickr)

Proud as a peacock!

On that particular day in Barcelona at the zoo, there were a few proud peacocks (Pavo cristatus) strutting their stuff to very disinterested peahens! Growing up in India, the peacock was a relatively common sight, and their plaintive calls at sunset time during summers usually heralded possible rain!

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Bible stories in Barcelona

Details of carvings on one of the gigantic doors on the passion facade of that Antoni Gaudi classic – La Sagrada Familia. The carvings portray different stories from the bible. This structure has been under construction since the 1880. More fantastic pictures from this basilica to follow soon!

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Details of carvings on the door of La Sagrada Familia in Barcelona. Please click on the picture for more viewing options on Flickr.

Now you see it, now you don’t

Now here’s an experiment at removing those irritating lines and wires that make their way into every photo (especially those in cities). Having read about Snapheal CK, I bit the bullet and bought a copy of the license. And the results are below to compare. Snapheal makes removing lines, wires and other unwanted features from a picture a doddle. Interestingly enough, the algorithm underneath the hood does a brilliant job and understanding the background patterns so that there are no ghosts left from the removal! Of course, nothing is perfect and one shouldn’t expect miracles and nothing can rescue a badly composed photograph.

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The photos above are of Casa Bruno Cuadros (a famous umbrella shop in the La Rambla area of Barcelona), and show the photos before and after treatment with Snapheal CK.