Domus Severiana

There is not much left of this roman palace built in the 2nd century CE except the lofty arches. Built during the reign of emperor Septimius Severus, this artists impression shows what palaces on Palatine Hill would have looked like.

Below is a photograph of one of the sides of the Domus Severiana. Bracketed HDR of three shots at -2, 0 and +2 eV, and then processed in Photomatix Pro and Adobe Lightroom Classic. Click on the photo for a large version on Flickr.

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The temple of Saturn

Not much remains of the temple of Saturn in the Roman Forum, except these 8 pillars and the pediment which reads:

Senatus Populusque Romaus, incendio consumptum restituit

Or translated as “The senate and people of Rome, restored (this temple that was) destroyed by fire”.

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Bridge over the Tiber

View of the Ponte Vittorio Emanuele II over the Tiber river in Rome at sunset. The bridge was designed by Ennio di Rossi in the late 19th century but construction was not completed till early 20th century. The bridge is named after Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of an united Italy since the 6th century. Shot from Castel Sant’Angelo.

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Shot on a Nikon D750 camera with an 28-300mm Nikon lens. Post-processed in Adobe Lightroom.

The Colosseum in Rome

Probably the best known edifice in Rome, instantly recognizable and photographed thousands of times every hour by the millions who visit this every year. Construction of this amphitheater was begun in 72AD under the reign of Emperor Vespasian and finished in 80AD under Emperor Titus.

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Audley End House, Saffron Walden

Audley End house is a magnificent example of a 17th century stately home near Saffron Walden in Essex. The property was also once a royal palace in the time of Charles II (1668) who purchased the property for £5 in order to be able to attend races at Newmarket. Audley End is now managed by English Heritage but all paintings and period decorations are from the original time and form part of a private collection. 

Audley End House. Essex
Audley End House. Essex

HDR composed of three bracketed shots at -2, 0 and +2 exposures and processed in Photomatix Pro. Please click on the photo for a larger version.

The Alamo!

The battle of the Alamo (1836) has attained a mythical status in american culture and history. The story of this battle has been told many times in print and on film, so much so that it is now difficult to separate truth from hype and fiction. Either way, the remains of the Alamo mission is a historical legacy of the wars between american forces of the Texas colonist and Mexico leading to the establishment of the Republic of Texas. The story of a few embattled soldiers fighting against an overwhelming force resounds throughout human history and the Alamo is one such example of exemplary bravery in the face of all odds.

The Alamo Mission, San Antonio
The Alamo mission. Ruins from the Battle of the Alamo (1836). Click on the photo for a larger version.

 

Photographed at ISO100, f/14 20 second exposure. Sigma 28-70 f/2.8 lens perched on a bottle cap!

The forgotten treasure!

In any other city but Agra, home to the famous Taj Mahal, this architectural beauty would be classed as one of the wondrous feat of art and architecture. A pity then, that this beautiful marble building often gets overlooked by visitors to the Taj and Agra fort. And a blessing for providing plenty of opportunities for quiet photography!

Itmad-ud-Daulah, Agra
Itmad-ud-Daulah, Agra, India. Click on the photo for a larger version on Flickr

The Itmad-Ud-Daulah was commissioned by Noor Jehan, wife of the mughal emperor Jehangir and built between 1621 and 1628. This building is considered to be the precursor of the Taj Mahal and utilises similar design element, albeit on a smaller scale. The relatives of Noor Jehan (including her father) are interred in this mausoleum. Like in the Taj Mahal, the buildings and grounds are built to exquisite symmetry, disrupted only by the positions of the cenotaphs of Noor Jehan’s parents (similarly followed in the Taj Mahal, built almost 30 years later). The building is made of white marble inlaid with semi-precious stones.

The Taj Mahal – Recovered after 9 years!

I recently re-processed a picture of the Taj Mahal that I photographed in 2004. The original photograph was taken as dusk and fog and pollution added to the haziness of the photo. Re-processing the picture has brought out the details, what do you think?

Taj Mahal, Agra
After re-processing! Click on the photo for a larger version on Flickr.

The original photo (before processing) is below.

Taj in the Mist
Before reprocessing! The haze overwhelmed the Taj!

There is something to be said for the merits of going back and looking over old photos and trying to improve them using modern post-processing techniques.